Department of Defense Laboratories

The Department’s Laboratories engage in activities ranging from basic research through defense system acquisition support to direct operational support of deployed warfighters. These Laboratories are comprised of dozens of facilities across 22 states, and employs tens of thousands of scientists and engineers, both civilian and military, public employees and contractors.

The Department Laboratories execute a substantial fraction of the Department’s S&T accounts, particularly in budget activities 6.2 and 6.3. In addition, they conduct substantial amounts of reimbursable research and development (R&D) for DoD and Intelligence Community customer organizations.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (April 23, 2018) Hospitalman Joseph Kim, a native of Dallas, Texas, draws serum into a cuvette at Naval Hospital Jacksonville’s laboratory. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel, Naval Hospital Jacksonville/Released).

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (April 23, 2018) Hospitalman Joseph Kim, a native of Dallas, Texas, draws serum into a cuvette at Naval Hospital Jacksonville’s laboratory. “We do something different every day. It’s exciting, makes you feel like a scientist; we understand the importance the laboratory plays in medical readiness.” Medical Laboratory Professionals Week, April 22- 28, is a celebration of medical laboratory professionals and pathologists who play a vital role in health care and patient advocacy. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel, Naval Hospital Jacksonville/Released).
WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio – A technique called Hybrid 3D Printing, developed by AFRL researchers in collaboration with the Wyss Institute at Harvard University, uses additive manufacturing to integrate soft, conductive inks with material substrates to create stretchable electronic devices. To create these, a 3-D printer prints conductive traces of flexible, silver-infused thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). Then, a pick-and-place method using empty printer nozzles and a vacuum system sets microcontroller chips and LED lights into the flexible substrate. (Wyss Institute Courtesy Photo)

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio – A technique called Hybrid 3D Printing, developed by AFRL researchers in collaboration with the Wyss Institute at Harvard University, uses additive manufacturing to integrate soft, conductive inks with material substrates to create stretchable electronic devices. To create these, a 3-D printer prints conductive traces of flexible, silver-infused thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). Then, a pick-and-place method using empty printer nozzles and a vacuum system sets microcontroller chips and LED lights into the flexible substrate. (Wyss Institute Courtesy Photo, 2017)

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (May 10, 2018) (left to right) Sports Medicine Physician Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Bernstein, with Family Medicine Physicians Lt. Kerry Sadler and Lt. Paul Seales, examine a patient's knee at Naval Hospital Jacksonville's family medicine clinic. Patients can ask their primary care manager for a referral to Family Medicine Musculoskeletal Injections Clinic. The clinic provides sports medicine expertise and ultrasound-guided injections when appropriate for joint pain and function. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel, Naval Hospital Jacksonville/Released).

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (May 10, 2018) (left to right) Sports Medicine Physician Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Bernstein, with Family Medicine Physicians Lt. Kerry Sadler and Lt. Paul Seales, examine a patient's knee at Naval Hospital Jacksonville's family medicine clinic. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel, Naval Hospital Jacksonville/Released).

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